Stirling Austin

Interim, acting, project, contract, fractional. The difference between titles can be confusing, but they all point to a specialised type of temporary executive that companies call on when they are going through transformation, or for a project.

Interim, acting, project, contract, fractional. The difference between titles can be confusing, but they all point to a specialised type of temporary executive that companies call on when they are going through transformation, or for a project.

Interim, acting, project, contract, fractional. The difference between titles can be confusing, but they all point to a specialised type of temporary executive that companies call on when they are going through transformation, or for a project.

Interim, acting, project, contract, fractional. The difference between titles can be confusing, but they all point to a specialised type of temporary executive that companies call on when they are going through transformation, or for a project.

International mergers can yield some great benefits. They offer an easier and cheaper way in to access a new market and labour force as well as offering firms the chance to diversify their portfolio. But they don’t always succeed.

Interim, acting, project, contract, fractional. The difference between titles can be confusing, but they all point to a specialised type of temporary executive that companies call on when they are going through transformation, or for a project.

The nature of work is changing in an increasingly globalised and digitised world. Traditions such as the 9-5 office role or punch-in punch-out shift-work, while not exactly disappearing, are making way for the phenomenon known as remote working.

As any body language expert will tell you, our bodies often sing from a totally different hymn sheet from our mouths. This could be seen most recently last week with the much-publicised meeting between Donald Trump and Emmanuel Macron.

Mergers and acquisitions (M&A) have been a headline news topic this week with the proposed supermarket merger between Sainsbury’s and Asda.

As companies continue to expand across borders and the global marketplace becomes increasingly more accessible for small and large businesses alike, there are ever more opportunities to work internationally.

The job market is more competitive and globalized than ever before, and successful candidates must be able to cross cultural and linguistic borders. Not only does knowing a second language provide many different cognitive benefits, it also can help give your business the competitive edge.

As companies look to expand internationally, many are turning to cross-border asset-based lending as a solution to help enhance liquidity and provide flexibility within their capital structures.

The UK must radically overhaul its “alarmingly deficient” foreign language teaching to focus on German, Mandarin and Arabic or risk floundering in the global market

The majority of global investors polled in a new survey for the launch of Invest Week believe Europe has become a more attractive investment destination and expect investment to increase.

Private equity and venture capital investment into central and eastern Europe (CEE) shot up last year, according to new statistics from trade body Invest Europe, reaching the highest level since 2009.

PARIS (Reuters) – France’s corporate startup scene is gaining traction against the backdrop of booming investments by venture capital funds and high expectations for a business-friendly government under new President Emmanuel Macron.

France is known worldwide for its wine, food and culture, but under its new president, the French are aiming to be the new global hub for tech startups.

London remains the top European city for venture capital investment in financial technology firms, according to data released by Mayor Sadiq Khan’s promotional agency. London & Partners.

Many UK companies are complacent about the need to include languages as a key skillset in the job specification for international positions, however this is often a critical factor for success.

Major European languages remain in high demand from British businesses but there are signs of a shift towards languages used in the world’s fastest growing markets, such as Mandarin and Arabic.

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